China emission accounts are primarily built upon novel, robust, interdisciplinary and highly impacted academic research. CEADs team publishes in the field of energy and emission inventory compilation, emission sources and drivers, environmental input-output analysis and policy analysis.
  • The cascade of global trade to large climate forcing over the Tibetan Plateau glaciers
    Nature Communications | July 23, 2019

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols constitute unique andimportant anthropogenic climate forcers that potentially accelerate the retreatof glaciers over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP). Here we show that alarge amount of BC emissions produced in India and China-a region of BCemissions to which the HTP is more vulnerable compared with other region-arerelated to the consumption of goods and services in the USA and Europe throughinternationa...

  • Impact of a coal-fired power plant shutdown campaign on heavy metal emissions in China
    Environmental Science&Technology | November 04, 2019

    Recently, China has committed to decommissioning theheavy metal (HM) intensive coal-fired power plants (CFPPs), small unitsespecially, yet a quantitative assessment for the impact on HM emissionsremains poorly understood. This study, for the first time, compiles aplant-specific inventory for six HMs (Hg,As,Se,Pb,Cd,and Cr) avoided by CFPPsdecommissioned in China during the 12th Five Year Plan period. The reduced HMamounts to 271.58 t (9....

  • A city-level inventory for atmospheric mercury emissions from coal combustion in China
    Atmospheric Environment | February 15, 2020

    Cities are essential entities for dedicatedmercury control policies. However, the city-level mercury emission inventory asthe cornerstone of proper policy design is still in its infancy, due to dataavailability. For the first time, this study developed a comprehensivecity-level atmospheric mercury emission inventory from coal combustion in Chinain 2010, by updating emission factors based on high-resolution information suchas the plant-s...

  • Committed emissions from existing energy infrastructure jeopardize 1.5℃ climate target
    Nature.In Press | July 01, 2019

    Net anthropogenic emissions of carbondioxide (CO2) must approach zero by mid-century (2050) in order to stabilizethe global mean temperature at the level targeted by international efforts. Yetcontinued expansion of fossil-fuel-burning energy infrastructure impliesalready‘committed’future CO2 emissions. Here we use detailed datasets of existingfossil-fuel energy infrastructure in 2018 to estimate regional and sectoralpatterns of comm...

  • Substantial emission reductions from Chinese power plants after the introduction of ultra-low emissi
    Nature Energy | October 07, 2019

    In 2014, China introduced an ultra-low emissions (ULE)standards policy for renovating coal-fired power-generating units to limit SO2,NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions to 35, 50 and 10 mg m−3, respectively. The ULEstandard policy had ambitious levels (surpassing those of all other countries)and implementation timeline. We estimate emission reductions associated withthe ULE policy by constructing a nationwide, unit-level, hou...

  • Critical Rare-Earth Elements Mismatch Global Wind-Power Ambitions
    One Earth | June 24, 2020

    Wind power needs to be expanded rapidlyacross the world to stabilize our climate. However, there are increasingconcerns about conflicts between the supply of rare-earth elements (REs)(mainly neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium) and the global expansion ofwind power. Here, we provide a dynamic, technology-rich, and regional-specificapproach to exploring such conflicts among ten world regions through 2050 underfour widely recognized c...

  • Patterns of CO2 emissions in 18 central Chinese cities from 2000 to 2014
    Journal of Cleaner Production | January 20, 2018

    With the Rise of Central China Plan, the central region has had a great opportunity to develop its economy and improve its original industrial structure. However, this region is also under pressure to protect its environment, keep its development sustainable and reduce carbon emissions . Therefore, accurately estimating the temporal and spatial dynamics of CO 2 emissions and analysing the factors influencing these emissions are especiall...

  • The spatiotemporal features of greenhouse gases emissions from biomass burning in China from 2000 to
    Journal of Cleaner Production | April 20, 2018

    Greenhouse gases emissions from biomass burning have been given a little attention, especially the spatiotemporal features of biomass burning sources and greenhouse gases emissions have not been comprehensively uncovered. This research undertook IPCC bottom-up inventory guideline to estimate Chinese greenhouse gases emissions from biomass burning and applied geographical information system to reveal biomass burning emissions spatiotempo...

  • Socioeconomic and atmospheric factors affecting aerosol radiative forcing: Production-based versus c
    Atmospheric Environment | March 01, 2019

    There exist substantial differences in top-of-atmosphere direct radiative forcing of aerosols due to a region's economic production (RF p ) and consumption (RF c ), in the context of economic globalization, trade and globalizing air pollution. Yet an explicit systematic analysis of all socioeconomic and atmospheric factors determining the RF difference is lacking. Here, we evaluate five socioeconomic (population, per capita output, emiss...

  • Carbon emission imbalances and the structural paths of Chinese regions
    Applied Energy | April 01, 2018

    As the Chinese regions become more and more connected to each other and foreign countries, this study aims to address carbon imbalance and outsourcing issues in China. Using a production-based carbon emission inventory and a China-global multi-regional input-output model, this study estimates the consumption-based carbon emissions in 30 Chinese regions in 2007 and 2010. Our results reveal that the carbon imbalances of most Chinese provin...

  • The comprehensive environmental efficiency of socioeconomic sectors in China: An analysis based on a
    Journal of Cleaner Production | March 01, 2018

    The increasingly high frequency of heavy air pollution in most regions of China signals the urgent need for the transition to an environmentally friendly production performance by socioeconomic sectors for the sake of people's health and sustainable development. Focusing on CO 2 and major air pollutants , this paper presents a comprehensive environmental efficiency index based on evaluating the environmental efficiency of major socioecon...

  • Structural decline in China’s CO2 emissions through transitions in industry and energy systems
    Nature Geoscience | July 02, 2018

    As part of the Paris Agreement, China pledged to peak its CO 2 emissions by 2030. In retrospect, the commitment may have been fulfilled as it was being made—China’s emissions peaked in 2013 at a level of 9.53 gigatons of CO 2 , and have declined in each year from 2014 to 2016. However, the prospect of maintaining the continuance of these reductions depends on the relative contributions of different changes in China. Here, we quantita...

  • Demand-driven air pollutant emissions for a fast-developing region in China
    Applied Energy | October 15, 2017

    Guangdong is one of many fast-developing regions in China that are confronting the challenges of air pollution mitigation and sustainable economic development. Previous studies have focused on the characterization of production-based emissions to formulate control strategies, but the drivers of emission growth and pattern changes from the consumption side have rarely been explored. In this study, we used environmentally extended input-o...

  • Socioeconomic impact assessment of China's CO2 emissions peak prior to 2030
    Journal of Cleaner Production | January 20, 2017

    China is the largest emitter of carbon emissions in the world. In this paper, we present an Integrated Model of Economy and Climate (IMEC), an optimization model based on the input-output model. The model is designed to assess the tradeoff between emission deceleration and economic growth. Given that China's projected average growth rate will exceed 5% over the next two decades, we find that China may reach its peak CO 2 emissions levels...

  • Pattern changes in determinants of Chinese emissions
    Environmental Research Letters | June 27, 2017

    The Chinese economy has been recovering slowly from the global financial crisis, but it cannot achieve the same rapid development of the pre-recession period. Instead, the country has entered a new phase of economic development—a 'new normal'. We use a structural decomposition analysis and environmental input–output analysis to estimate the determinants of China's carbon emission changes during 2005–2012. China's imports are linked...

  • Using an extended LMDI model to explore techno-economic drivers of energy-related industrial CO2 emi
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | March 01, 2016

    Although investment and RD activities can exert significant effects on energy-related industrial CO2 emissions (EICE), related factors have not been fairly uncovered in the existing index decomposition studies. This paper extends the previous logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) decomposition model by introducing three novel factors (RD intensity, investment intensity, and RD efficiency). The extended model not only considers the conve...

  • Driving forces of Chinese primary air pollution emissions: an index decomposition analysis
    Journal of Cleaner Production | December 01, 2016

    Emissions of the fine particulate matters (diameter of 2.5μm or less) caused by both the primary particle emissions and the precursor emission sources such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides , have contributed significantly to poor urban air quality in China, and have attracted tremendous public attention over the past few years. This study provides an interdisciplinary study to investigate the key contributors driving air pollution ...

  • Socioeconomic Drivers of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States
    Environmental Science & Technology | July 19, 2016

    Existing studies examined the U.S.'s direct GHG emitters and final consumers driving upstream GHG emissions, but overlooked the U.S.'s primary suppliers enabling downstream GHG emissions and relative contributions of socioeconomic factors to GHG emission changes from the supply side. This study investigates GHG emissions of sectors in the U.S. from production-based (direct emissions), consumption-based (upstream emissions driven by final...

  • Determinants of global CO2 emissions growth
    Applied Energy | December 15, 2016

    This paper analyzes global CO 2 emissions growth by fossil fuel type (coal, oil or gas), demand type (consumption or investment), country group (developed or developing country) and industry group. The results indicate that, among the three fossil fuels, CO 2 emissions from coal use grew the most rapidly in developing countries, by 3.76Gt in the period 1995–2009. By contrast, CO 2 emissions from natural gas use grew the most rapidly in...

  • Assessment of electrical vehicles as a successful driver for reducing CO2 emissions in China
    Applied Energy | December 15, 2016

    This paper analyses the impacts of the gasoline vehicle replacement programme with EVs at different penetration rates on petroleum and electricity sectors and their CO 2 emissions. The study utilises a top-down-type Environmental Input–Output (EI–O) model. Our results show that the replacement of gasoline cars with EVs causes greater impacts on total gasoline production than on total electricity generation. For example, at 5%, 20%, 5...

  • Climate change mitigation in Chinese megacities: A measures-based analysis of opportunities in the r
    Applied Energy | December 15, 2016

    China’s commitment to the UNFCCC to peak its emissions by 2030, or sooner, signaled a long anticipated shift in China’s model of development with far reaching consequences. Cities in China, and particularly the residential sector in cities, will be charged with making significant reductions in emissions growth even as rates of urbanization continue to climb. Focusing on Beijing and Shanghai, this paper carries out a measures-based ec...

  • How will greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles be constrained in China around 2030?
    Applied Energy | October 15, 2015

    Increasing emissions from road transportation endanger China’s objective to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The unconstrained growth of vehicle GHG emissions are mainly caused by the insufficient improvement of energy efficiency (kilometers traveled per unit energy use) under current policies, which cannot offset the explosion of vehicle activity in China, especially the major southern provinces. More stringent polices ...

  • Examining Air Pollution in China Using Production- And Consumption-Based Emissions Accounting Approa
    Environmental Science & Technology | November 17, 2014

    Two important reasons for China’s air pollution are the high emission factors (emission per unit of product) of pollution sources and the high emission intensity (emissions per unit of GDP) of the industrial structure. Therefore, a wide variety of policy measures, including both emission abatement technologies and economic adjustment, must be implemented. To support such measures, this study used the production- and consumption-based e...

  • The socioeconomic drivers of China's primary PM2.5 emissions
    Environmental Research Letters | February 19, 2014

    Primary PM 2.5 emissions contributed significantly to poor air quality in China. We present an interdisciplinary study to measure the magnitudes of socioeconomic factors in driving primary PM 2.5 emission changes in China between 1997–2010, by using a regional emission inventory as input into an environmentally extended input–output framework and applying structural decomposition analysis. Our results show that China's significant ef...

  • Comparative Analysis of Carbonization Drivers in China's Megacities
    Journal of Industrial Ecology | July 30, 2012

    This study investigates the key drivers affecting emission increases in terms of population growth, economic growth, industrial transformation, and energy use in six Chinese megacities: Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Chongqing, Guangzhou, and Hong Kong. The six cities represent the most‐developed regions in China and they have similar per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions as many developed countries. There is an urgent need to quant...

  • Analyzing Drivers of Regional Carbon Dioxide Emissions for China
    Journal of Industrial Ecology | June 27, 2012

    China faces the challenge of balancing unprecedented economic growth and environmental sustainability. Rather than a homogenous country that can be analyzed at the national level, China is a vast country with significant regional differences in physical geography, regional economy, demographics, industry structure, and household consumption patterns. There are pronounced differences between the much‐developed Eastern‐Coastal economic...

  • Low-carbon development in the least developed region: a case study of Guangyuan, Sichuan province, s
    Natural Hazards | October 12, 2011

    The Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 has resulted in 50% of Guangyuan city facing recovery from different extents of damages. The massive reconstruction provides a good opportunity for Guangyuan city to response to the National Council’s call for tackling climate change by developing a harmonised and low-carbon economy. However, there are many arguments about the definition of ‘low carbon’ and the framework that low-carbon development s...

  • Mapping Flows of Embodied Emissions in the Global Production System
    Environmental Science & Technology | November 03, 2011

    Environmentally extended multiregional input-output (MRIO) analysis can be used to investigate final production and consumption attributions of emissions. As the distinction between the two attributions has been brought to the attention of policy-makers, there is an ever greater need to understand how and why they differ, by analyzing the connections between production and consumption activities. Seeking to meet this need, we present an ...

  • A “Carbonizing Dragon”: China’s Fast Growing CO2 Emissions Revisited
    Environmental Science & Technology | September 02, 2011

    China’s annual CO 2 emissions grew by around 4 billion tonnes between 1992 and 2007. More than 70% of this increase occurred between 2002 and 2007. While growing export demand contributed more than 50% to the CO 2 emission growth between 2002 and 2005, capital investments have been responsible for 61% of emission growth in China between 2005 and 2007. We use structural decomposition analysis to identify the drivers for China’s emissi...

  • Journey to world top emitter: An analysis of the driving forces of China's recent CO2 emissions surg
    Geophysical Research Letters | February 27, 2009

    China's economy has been growing at an accelerated rate from 2002 to 2005 and with it China's carbon emissions. It is easier to understand the growth in China's carbon emissions by considering which consumption activities ‐ households and government, capital investments, and international trade ‐ drive Chinese production and hence emissions. This paper adopts structural decomposition analysis, a macro‐economic approach using data f...

  • Lifestyles, technology and CO2 emissions in China: A regional comparative analysis
    Ecological Economics | November 15, 2009

    With rapid economic development, higher income levels, urbanization and other socio-economic drivers, people's lifestyles in China have changed remarkably over the last 50years. This paper uses the IPAT model (where I =Impact representing CO 2 emissions, P =Population, A =Affluence, and T =emission intensity) to analyze how these main drivers contributed to the growth of CO 2 emissions over this time period. Affluence or lifestyle chang...

  • The drivers of Chinese CO2 emissions from 1980 to 2030
    Global Environmental Change | October 01, 2008

    China's energy consumption doubled within the first 25 years of economic reforms initiated at the end of the 1970s, and doubled again in the past 5 years. It has resulted of a threefold CO 2 emissions increase since early of 1980s. China's heavy reliance on coal will make it the largest emitter of CO 2 in the world. By combining structural decomposition and input–output analysis we seek to assess the driving forces of China's CO 2 emis...

  • The contribution of Chinese exports to climate change
    Energy Policy | September 01, 2008

    Within 5 years, China's CO 2 emissions have nearly doubled, and China may already be the world's largest emitter of CO 2 . Evidence suggests that exports could be a main cause for the rise in Chinese CO 2 emissions; however, no systematic study has analyzed this issue, especially over time. We find that in 2005, around one-third of Chinese emissions (1700Mt CO 2 ) were due to production of exports, and this proportion has risen from 12% ...

  • China's Growing CO2 EmissionsA Race between Increasing Consumption and Efficiency Gains
    Environmental Science & Technology | August 02, 2007

    China's rapidly growing economy and energy consumption are creating serious environmental problems on both local and global scales. Understanding the key drivers behind China's growing energy consumption and the associated CO 2 emissions is critical for the development of global climate policies and provides insight into how other emerging economies may develop a low emissions future. Using recently released Chinese economic input−outp...